Academic Papers

Meat and cancer

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Cancer Council NSW 2015

Risk in Red Meat?

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Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D. Assistant Editors: Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D., Geriann Piazza

Association between dietary fibre intake and fruit, vegetable or whole-grain consumption and the risk of CVD: results from the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) trial.

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1.The PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) Research Network (RD 06/0045),Madrid,Spain.
2.Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn),Instituto de Salud Carlos III,28029-Madrid,Spain.

Diet and risk of kidney stones in the Oxford cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

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1. Department of Urology, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK,ben.turney@nds.ox.ac.uk

Association between dietary vitamin C intake and risk of esophageal cancer

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1. Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450001, China.
2.The North Hospital of the Ninth People’s Hospital of Shanghai City, Shanghai, 201999, China.
3.Henan Tumor Hospital, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450003, China.

Maternal consumption of cured meats and vitamins in relation to pediatric brain tumors

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1. Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles 90033-0800, USA.

Elderly Taiwanese who spend more on fruits and vegetables and less on animal-derived foods use less medical services and incur lower medical costs

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1. 1School of Public Health,National Defense Medical Center,Taipei 11490,Taiwan, ROC.
2. 4National Defense Medical Center,Graduate Institute of Life Sciences,Taipei 11490,Taiwan, ROC.

Dietary factors associated with bladder cancer

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1.Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL, USA.

Red Meat and Processed Meat Consumption and Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Risk

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1.a Department of Hospital Infection Management, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University , Zhengzhou, Henan , China.
2.b Department of Nosocomial Infection Management , Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University , Zhengzhou, Henan China.
3.c Department of Epidemiology , College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University , Zhengzhou, Henan , China.
4.d Henan Key Laboratory of Tumor Epidemiology , Zhengzhou, Henan , China.
5.e College of Professional Study, Northeastern University , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

Dietary risk factors for colorectal cancer in Brazil

Author Information:

1. Department of Digestive Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Campinas State University, Campinas, São Paulo,Brazil. sandronunesangel@uol.com.br.
2. Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Campinas State University, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
3. Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Campinas State University, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
4. Department of Biostatistics, Bioscience Institute, Paulista State University, Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
5. Department of Digestive Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Campinas State U
niversity, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.

Animal protein and the risk of kidney stones

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1. Department of Urology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
2. Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.
3. Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.
4. Jane and Charles Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University ofTexas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.
5.Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center,
Dallas, Texas.
6
Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas;
Jane and Charle
s Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of
Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address:
Margaret.pearle@utsouthwestern.edu.

Nutrient-Gene Interaction in Colon Cancer, from the Membrane to Cellular Physiology

Author Information:

1. Program in Integrative Nutrition and Complex Diseases, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843; email:r
– chapkin@tamu.edu.
2. Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.
3. Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.
4.Center for Translational Environmental Health Research, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.
5.Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.
6.Faculty of Toxicology, Texas A&M University, College
Station, Texas 77843.

The protective effect of peanut

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1. Instituto Estatal de Cancerologia, Servicios de Saluddel Estado de Colima, University of Colima, Colima, Mexico.

Meat intake and mortality: a prospective study of over half a million people

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1.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute-Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20852, USA. sinhar@nih.gov

Dietary cholesterol and egg yolks: not for patients at risk of vascular disease

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1 Stroke Prevention & Atheroschlerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, London,Ontario.dspence@robarts.ca

Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies

Author Information:

1. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
2. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
3.Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
4.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD.
5.Nuffield Department of Population Health, Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
6.Department of Epidemiology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
7.Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
8.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
9.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
10.Department of Food and Chemical Risk Analysis, TNO Quality of Life, Zeist, The Netherlands.
11.Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
12.SWOG Statistical Center, Seattle, WA.
13.Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
14.Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
15.Nuffield Department of Population Health, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
16. Department of Epidemiology, Cancer Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI.
17.Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
18.Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
19.Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
20.Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
21. Cancer Prevention Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

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